Categories
Lifestyle

Black Friday at Shoprite Novare Mall

Today, 25th November was Black Friday, possibly, the world over.

It was no different here in Nigeria where retailers fell over themselves trying to woo customers with what they touted as fantastic promotional offers.

Ever since the culture of online shopping became entrench in our psyche as Nigerians, there have been a surge in the popularity of the concept of Black Friday. And over the years too, even the brick and mortal stores have picked up on this fad, perhaps after noticing the big haul made by the online stores during this period.

Unfortunately, Nigeria’s adaptation of Black Friday has been seen largely as a scam. Major online retail stores have been accused of giving fictitious and non-existent discounts on their products after manipulating their listed prices. There have been a growing apathy by Nigerians to to this alien concept of Black Friday.

It was with this reservation at the back of my mind that i took a drive to Shoprite in Novare mall to see what they have on offer for Black Friday. It was a short drive from my home, so i felt i did not have much to lose anyway. At worst, i will just window shop if the prices were not right.

On reaching there, i got a very big shock.

Those who had witnessed the thick human traffic in Oshodi (Lagos) back in the 1990s would probably understand what i saw as i entered the store.  The crowd in the store was unbelievable. A quick glance at the in-store flyer and, suddenly, I knew why. The store was offering large discounts on a not so long list of groceries; Noodles, Pepsi et al, Kellogs cereal, vegetable oil, Colgate toothpaste, and a bunch of other items. It didnt help that it was month end and a lot of women were also doing their monthly grocery shopping for December.

Nigerians and awoof!

Indeed, it was a struggle getting round the aisles. “Excuse me … sorry … ” was my sing-song as i tried to weave my shopping cart through the human traffic, sometimes intentionally – “innocently” – using my cart to brush past some shoppers who chose to stand still in the middle of aisles.

I was not very surprised that most of the items with large discounts were fast running out. Some had actually run out. The time was just about 10am.
It was all too much effort and after about 30 minutes of weaving through the crowd, i was getting tired and could not wait to leave the store.

If only i knew.

On an average day, queues at Shoprite tills can be long and rowdy. Today was not an average day. The queue was very long, windy and of course, unruly. Worst still, there were no store officials in sight to organize the queues and make the process faster.

At a point, i was tempted to abandon my cart and walk away. Then i remembered the effort i put into making my selections and decided to wait it out. It ended up being a 2 hour wait.

The cashier at Till Point 2 spent about 30 minutes on a single customer, a lady two steps ahead of me on the queue, who had problems with her Diamond bank ATM. I was livid but kept quiet. Anyway, I didn’t need to talk. They were 3 women at the sidelines who were doing a better job than i could ever do.

Finally, it was my turn.

Thankfully it was uneventful, and i was out of the door about 10 minutes later, with a sigh of relief, whistling to Craig David’s 2000 hit “Walking Away” wafting through the in-store speakers, not sure how soon i will be visiting that store again, if at all;

I’m walking away from the troubles in my life
I’m walking away oh to find a better day
I’m walking away from the troubles in my life
I’m walking away oh to find a better day
I’m walking away

Categories
Gadgets Lifestyle

A Geek Gift For My Son At 10

My older son turned 10 years recently. A milestone. A big excuse for an “owambe” party.

Instead, the introvert in me opted for a quiet family outing, a decision that was further reinforced by the spiraling exchange rate. Well, that is the excuse we all give for our cost cutting? 🙂

Weakened Naira or not, i could not talk my self out of a gift for him.

It did not take me too long to decide on a gift though, a decision probably influenced by a previous addiction – A Gaming Console.

Old timers on this blog would probably remember Sega Genesis, known outside the USA as Sega Mega Drive. Those were the days Sega ruled the gaming world. The popular gaming console even got a mention in the Notorious B.I.G.’s breakout hit back in 1994; “Juicy“.

Almost every waking hour i had, NEPA willing, i was behind the gaming console. Mortal Kombat 3 was my favourite game cartridge. Yes, those 16 bit games back then came in cartridges. I had permanent sore thumbs from making all those “finishing” moves.

Perhaps, it wouldn’t be a bad idea to relive those good old days, live vicariously through my son? Hmmm.

(To Be Continued)

Categories
Lifestyle

Off To Novare Mall!

First day away from work. What an exhilarating experience! Ice Cube’s hit tune “Today was a good day” was buzzing in my brain.

“How best can i spend today”, i thought to myself.

“A visit to the cinema perhaps”? Hmm, a visit to the cinema it is!

Off to Novare!

Ever since Novare Mall opened its doors in late August 2016, work constraints had prevented me from visiting. Funny thing is, the mall is less than 15 minutes away from my home.

By 9am, i was on already my way, in one of my trademark NFL jerseys on a very used blue jeans. Ditched my car and opted for a Keke Marwa, a tricycle used for public transportation in Lagos.

It is true what they say about the Novare mall. Indeed, it is the biggest mall in Nigeria. Sitting on a 22,000 sqm expanse of land. Its 1,000 parking slot is quite intimidating.

They were very few people in the mall when i got there, will attribute this to it being a week day. Perfect for me, i hate crowds. I could not help but feel a little disappointed though, as at least 90% of the stores were still not opened, over a month after. But the big ones were opened though – Game and Shoprite. Window shopped in the former for over an hour, fantasizing about all dem gadgets!

After a dissapointing cold meal of porridge and beef at Tantilizers, i drifted off to Genesis Cinema to see their movie line up for the day. Jason Statham’s Mechanic: Resurrection caught my eye immediately. Jason is one of the best actors to come out of that old boring Britain.

Paid N800 for the movie ticket, grabbed a large pop corn for an additional N800 and settled in for the movie. Action packed from beginning to end, the movie was worth every kobo of my investment.

Without doubt, the mall has brightened the landscape in that neighbourhood but it has also influenced property prices negatively too. Property rental and purchase prices have skyrocketed.

A small price to pay, but it is well worth it.

Categories
Lifestyle

10 Behaviors That Could Kill Your Career

Stumbled on this post on Linkedin by Jack Welch, former Chairman of General Electric, thought i should share. I think i identified 2 points i need to work on personally…

Careers rarely follow a smooth, linear trajectory. If you’re experiencing a stalled or faltering career — and most of us do at some point or another — take a good look in the mirror. Are you guilty of exhibiting any of these common behaviors? These ten career-killing pitfalls can mean the difference between an upward ride and a downward spiral at work. If you recognize your own behaviors here, make it your mission to change them — before you have to. In time, you’re likely to see your career move from a stall to a soar.

  • Misfiring on performance or values — Overcommitting and under-delivering.
  • Resistance to change — Failing to embrace new ideas.
  • Being a Problem Identifier vs a Problem Solver.
  • Winning over your boss but not your business peer group.
  • Always worrying about your next career move versus focusing on the present.
  • Running for office – it’s totally transparent to everyone but you!
  • Self-importance — exhibiting a humorless, rigid attitude.
  • Lacking the courage and conviction to push back on the system.
  • Forgetting to develop your own succession plan for when you get promoted.
  • Complacency — you’ve stopped growing.

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Categories
Lifestyle Religion

Question: “How should a Christian view politics?”

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Stumbled on this article. Thought I should share…

If there is anything that will spark a spontaneous debate, if not an outright argument, it is a discussion involving politics-even among believers. As followers of Christ, what should be our attitude and our involvement with politics? It has been said that “religion and politics don’t mix.” But is that really true? Can we have political views outside the considerations of our Christian faith? The answer is no, we cannot. The Bible gives us two truths regarding our stance towards politics and government.

The first truth is that the will of God permeates and supersedes every aspect of life. It is God’s will that takes precedence over everything and everyone (Matthew 6:33). God’s plans and purposes are fixed, and His will is inviolable. What He has purposed, He will bring to pass, and no government can thwart His will (Daniel 4:34-35). In fact, it is God who “sets up kings and deposes them” (Daniel 2:21) because “the Most High is sovereign over the kingdoms of men and gives them to anyone he wishes” (Daniel 4:17). A clear understanding of this truth will help us to see that politics is merely a method God uses to accomplish His will. Even though evil men abuse their political power, meaning it for evil, God means it for good, working “all things together for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28).

Second, we must grasp the fact that our government cannot save us! Only God can. We never read in the New Testament of Jesus or any of the apostles expending any time or energy schooling believers on how to reform the pagan world of its idolatrous, immoral, and corrupt practices via the government. The apostles never called for believers to demonstrate civil disobedience to protest the Roman Empire’s unjust laws or brutal schemes. Instead, the apostles commanded the first-century Christians, as well as us today, to proclaim the gospel and live lives that give clear evidence to the gospel’s transforming power.

There is no doubt that our responsibility to government is to obey the laws and be good citizens (Romans 13:1-2). God has established all authority, and He does so for our benefit, “to commend those who do right” (1 Peter 2:13-15). Paul tells us in Romans 13:1-8 that it is the government’s responsibility to rule in authority over us-hopefully for our good-to collect taxes, and to keep the peace. Where we have a voice and can elect our leaders, we should exercise that right by voting for those whose views most closely parallel our own.

One of Satan’s grandest deceptions is that we can rest our hope for cultural morality and godly living in politicians and governmental officials. A nation’s hope for change is not to be found in any country’s ruling class. The church has made a mistake if it thinks that it is the job of politicians to defend, to advance, and to guard biblical truths and Christian values.

The church’s unique, God-given purpose does not lie in political activism. Nowhere in Scripture do we have the directive to spend our energy, our time, or our money in governmental affairs. Our mission lies not in changing the nation through political reform, but in changing hearts through the Word of God. When believers think the growth and influence of Christ can somehow be allied with government policy, they corrupt the mission of the church. Our Christian mandate is to spread the gospel of Christ and to preach against the sins of our time. Only as the hearts of individuals in a culture are changed by Christ will the culture begin to reflect that change.

Believers throughout the ages have lived, and even flourished, under antagonistic, repressive, pagan governments. This was especially true of the first-century believers who, under merciless political regimes, sustained their faith under immense cultural stress. They understood that it was they, not their governments, who were the light of the world and the salt of the earth. They adhered to Paul’s teaching to obey their governing authorities, even to honor, respect, and pray for them (Romans 13:1-8). More importantly, they understood that, as believers, their hope resided in the protection that only God supplies. The same holds true for us today. When we follow the teachings of the Scriptures, we become the light of the world as God has intended for us to be (Matthew 5:16).

Political entities are not the savior of the world. The salvation for all mankind has been manifested in Jesus Christ. God knew that our world needed saving long before any national government was ever founded. He demonstrated to the world that redemption could not be accomplished through the power of man, his economic strength, his military might, or his politics. Peace of mind, contentment, hope and joy-and the salvation of mankind-is accomplished only through His work of faith, love, and grace.

Source http://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-politics.html

Categories
Lifestyle

The African Version of Amazon Will Emerge From Nigeria

w575.jpg When Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announced the company’s plans for 30-minute delivery drones with Amazon Prime Air in December, it became clear that ecommerce has exciting days ahead.

But Amazon isn’t the only company ramping up digital business, nor is the U.S. the only region in the game. In fact, Africa may have already stolen a march on personal delivery from the air, and Nigeria — specifically the rapidly growing city of Lagos — may produce the next great ecommerce company.

See also: 20 Important African Startups to Watch

Africa’s tech space, which has been defined and accelerated by the mobile phone, is undoubtedly growing as investors scramble toward the continent. Various African countries have leapfrogged fixed-line Internet because of the ubiquity of cellphones and their networks, and entrepreneurs will likely tackle transportation in a similar way. Why build roads to inaccessible places when the air is a better and increasingly cheaper option?

A current initiative that addresses African drone delivery is the Flying Donkey Challenge, a 24-hour race around Mount Kenya where African companies have to deliver and collect 20-kilo payloads as they go. The winner receives a prize of more than $1 million.

But while these companies face huge challenges in circumnavigating Mount Kenya in East Africa, it’s actually in Nigeria, West Africa, where today’s challenges are almost unfathomable in scope — and, yet, also where future “African Amazons” are likely to emerge.

Lagos isn’t Nigeria’s capital city, but it is by far the biggest in the country. Depending on which statistics you believe, the city’s population is between 17 and 21 million, with 30,000 people arriving every week from across Africa.

Delivery in Lagos is utter chaos. There isn’t a viable postal service in the city — or the country, for that matter — and by all standards the city just shouldn’t work. But it does, and ecommerce companies are proliferating. Some even guarantee delivery of products across the city within 24 hours.

“By 2030, one in every six Africans will be Nigerians, and its economy will have the largest GDP on the continent,” says Betty Enyonam Kumahor, managing director of Africa for global IT consulting firm ThoughtWorks. “But understanding how to launch an ecommerce business in Nigeria requires an understanding of the ecosystem and country, and other aspects such as the cost of generators and the relative dearth of the talent pool.”
But ecommerce startups in Lagos, such as online grocery business Gloo.ng, are facing logistic problems beyond buying generators. There’s also the problems of trying to get through Lagos’ terrible traffic and finding addresses that often cannot be found on a map, for example.

Gloo.ng’s founder, Dr. Olumide Olusanya, is positioning the company as Nigeria’s equivalent of Ocado, the very successful UK delivery arm of Waitrose supermarket. Olusanya gave up practicing medicine to become an entrepreneur, and Gloo.ng has expanded rapidly in its short history. It has quadrupled in size in the past year, and in January moved to a 20,000 square feet fulfillment center in the city.

“We believe the timing of starting our company has been God-sent,” he says. “Brick-and-mortar supermarket shopping, which is exceedingly painful on this side of the world, is not yet culturally ingrained, and we will leapfrog the curve of building supermarket brick-and-mortar, as you have in the developed climes where this is an embedded culture.”

According to Olusanya, the two biggest brick-and-mortar players have a combined market share of 0.9%, with fewer than 13 outlets in a nation of 170 million people — a significant portion of whom are migrating to the middle class.

“The fact that 65% of first-time users become repeat shoppers with us is proof that we are on to something huge,” Olusanya says.

Ecommerce innovation isn’t limited to Nigeria, but entrepreneurs around the world are closely watching what is happening there. One such UK entrepreneur is Ivan Mazour, CEO of Ometria, a software company providing an ecommerce intelligence platform to retailers.

“Ecommerce is the next frontier for emerging markets — an unstoppable wave in the evolution of retail,” he says. “The MINT countries [Mexico, Indonesia, Nigeria and Turkey] are the future, and Nigeria is the most interesting of this new group. As an economy, it’s projected to go from the 39th largest GDP to 13th in the next two decades.”

More importantly, Mazour adds, Nigeria is already home to many successful ecommerce giants, including Konga and Jumia, two Nigerian ecommerce companies that have raised $63.5 million and $61 million respectively from global investors. These two companies provide the inspiration for African entrepreneurs, such as Gloo.ng’s Olusanya, as well as other more niche ecommerce companies to create Africa’s first retail hub or cluster in Lagos.

“[Ometria was] founded with a focus on bridging the gap between the knowledge that exists in developed markets. As we continue to expand globally, we are looking to Nigeria as a future ecommerce leader in the EMEA [Europe, Middle East and Africa] region,” Mazour says.

There’s also a wealth of exciting startups such as QSR Consult, a company that is developing three new “quick service” restaurants Grubs, Spice Bowl and Kobis in Nigeria. Tunde Ogunrinde, the company’s CEO, spent 17 years at Burger King UK and returned to Nigeria in 2009.

“There is a greater comfort with shopping online with many Nigerians nowadays due to pricing and non-payment until goods are delivered at the door of client,” Ogunrinde says. “It seems that Jumia [and] Konga are leading the market in terms of brand awareness and potential volumes. As confidence grows, this form of buying and selling will increase, but for many of these ecommerce companies, the biggest challenge is logistics and getting products to clients on time.”

So, while Bezos dreams of drones and talks hot air, and while some African companies clamber to join the race to Mount Kenya for the Flying Donkey Challenge, it’s Nigerian ecommerce startups that are doing it right now.

Moreover, they are finding quick success in one of the most competitive cities in the world. We’ll see drones over Lagos sooner than we think, and probably a lot sooner than the cities in the West.

 

Source

Categories
Humor Lifestyle

“Daddy, Where Is My Money?”

Every kid comes of age, the age when they begin to take their destinies into their hands.

Perhaps one of the earliest manifestation of this natural tendencies is when kids kick against the idea of their mother “keeping” their “hard earned” money for them. The age when they begin to realise that accountability has been lacking. This is usually the money gotten from family and friends as tips.

Stealing-money-from-piggy-bank (1)My 7 year old kid and his brother decided to get a piggy bank for themselves to keep their money, and of course, keeping proper records in the process. Each denomination was properly recorded in an old school notebook. He also put his elementary maths into good use by summing up the money, a grand total of N7,150 (US$45). The only information not captured was the serial numbers of the bills.

Over time, i had “borrowed” from this funds, interest-free and without necessary approvals, taking care to return the missing money before the next audit. And everything has been fine.

That was until one morning last week when i was woken up by my son, asking for the whereabout of his money.

Oops!

How do i explain to this kid, without losing face, that i had helped myself to his money?

“Ehm, it is with me. I…I.. will put it back”, i responded with a bold face.

Indeed, i felt like a thief.

Wonder what the guy was thinking as he left the room. I only wish he does not think of me as such.

Sigh.

Categories
Lifestyle Religion Technology

Does The Bible Say That An Increase In Technology Is A Sign Of The End Times?

Question: “Does the Bible say that an increase in technology is a sign of the end times?”

Many people over the years have proposed that there would be an increase in technology as the end times approach. Among those espousing this view were renowned scientists Isaac Newton and Francis Bacon. On the frontispiece of Bacon’s Instauratio Magna, ships of learning were depicted passing by the limits of human knowledge, with a quote in Latin from Daniel 12:4. In more recent times, this belief has been supported in books like Future Shock by Alvin Toffler and The Bible Code by Michael Drosnin.

In Future Shock, first published in 1970, Toffler described the results of the rapid advancement of technology he had observed in the 1950s and 1960s. As technology brought ever faster changes in society, certain people were left on the sidelines, unable to cope with the speed of change. That stress and disorientation in people was dubbed “future shock.” Toffler did not attempt to use the Bible in his work, but the concept of future shock was alluded to in works like Hal Lindsey’s Late Great Planet Earth, which was also published in 1970. Mr. Lindsey has made frequent mention of Daniel 12:4 as a prophecy of this rapid technological advance.

The Bible Code was based on the work of Eliahu Rips and others, who proposed that the history of all mankind was encoded in the text of the Torah and could be found by the process of “equidistant letter sequencing” or ELS. This concept was first proposed by Rabbi Bachya ben Asher in the 13th century, a man who is recognized as introducing the use of Kabbalah (Jewish mysticism) into the study of the Torah. According to this theory, the Hebrew word for “computer” is encoded in Daniel 12:4, thus giving apparent confirmation that technology would indeed have exponential advances with the advent of computers.

With this background information, we are still left with the question, “Does the Bible say that an increase in technology is a sign of the end times?” The short answer is “No.” Working backwards through the previous information, the concept of ELS has been heavily debated in both academic and religious circles. Intriguing discoveries have been made, but the methods by which they appear are suspect at best. The concept proposed by Rabbi ben Asher is related more to divination than to Bible study, and God condemns any method of discerning hidden knowledge (Deuteronomy 18:10,14).

But, as Toffler observed, there certainly has been an exponential increase of technology, and it appears to be gaining ground even more quickly. So what does the Bible have to say on this matter? Let’s take a look at the text in question, Daniel 12:4, “But thou, O Daniel, shut up the words, and seal the book, even to the time of the end: many shall run to and fro, and knowledge shall be increased.” Daniel was told that the meaning of his prophecy would be sealed until the time of its fulfillment was near. The majority of Bible scholars through the ages have understood the last two phrases to reference the prophecy itself. Jamieson, Fausset, and Brown’s critical commentary (published 1871) identified the meaning as scrutinizing every page to discover God’s purposes in the events foretold. John Darby translated the passage “many shall diligently investigate,” and Samuel Tregelles rendered it “many shall scrutinize the book from end to end.” Matthew Henry’s Commentary (c. 1700) said, “Then this hidden treasure shall be opened, and many shall search into it, and dig for the knowledge of it, as for silver. They shall run to and fro, to enquire out copies of it, shall collate them, and see that they be true and authentic. They shall read it over and over, shall meditate upon it, and run it over in their minds.”

Many passages of Scripture refer to what will happen at the end of the age, but no other passage seems to deal with increasing knowledge or technology as a sign for us. A greater sign is the advancement of the gospel which Jesus spoke of in Matthew 24:14 and which He commanded us to proclaim in Matthew 28:19-20. God’s goal for mankind isn’t to advance as far as we can or to know all we can discover, but rather that all should come to repentance (2 Peter 3:9).

TheEndOfTheWorld_Square

Source : GotQuestions.org

Categories
Lifestyle

Ten Ways Companies Drive Away Talent

This article was first published on Forbes.

If there’s one word that’s almost certain to appear somewhere on every business’s website, that word is talent. Companies of every size love to talk about talent! They can talk about talent all day long.

It’s easy to talk about talent on a website or in a recruiting brochure. It’s easy to say “We value talent more than anything!”

Talk is cheap. Attracting talented people into an organization and hanging onto them — now that’s another story.

Most employers, sad to say, do a better job of driving talented people away than reeling them in, both during the selection process and after the talented person comes on board as a new employee. They don’t do it intentionally, of course. They can’t see how their systems, policies and attitudes frustrate and repel great people. It starts with the ugly and tedious, Black Hole processes by which new employees get hired.

Those Applicant Tracking Systems are horrible talent repellents, but most of their owners don’t know they serve the same function as massive, barking, teeth-bared attack dogs at the gate.

Fearful people who believe they don’t have any power in their job search will submit to those awful systems. Switched-on people with alternatives will quickly say “Yikes, I’m not sticking around here” and apply for a job somewhere else.

Once a newcomer starts the job, there are more talent repellents waiting. Some of them are cultural. Some of them are operational.

Here are our Top Ten favorite Talent Repellents — ten ways employers drive brilliant people away from their doors.

ZOMBIE-FIED JOB ADS

If your firm likes to talk about talent, first take a look at your company’s job ads. Most job ads do a better job of explaining what the candidate must have than of selling the job to a possible applicant! If your job ads don’t use a human voice and spend as much time selling the job as tossing around Essential Requirements, all the talent-talk is merely lip service. (Never seen a job ad with a human voice? Here’s one.)

 

BLACK HOLE RECRUITING PORTALS If it takes a job-seeker an hour to complete all the mind-numbing fields in your Applicant Tracking System, the best people have already fled for greener pastures. If you’re a Recruiting Director or a curious CEO, ask your ATS vendor what the abandonment rate is on your recruiting site. How many people, in other words, start the process and then drop out of it? There’s your talent on the hoof, off to a friendlier welcome mat than you were able to lay out.

ROBOTIC COMMUNICATION

Once you start to communicate with applicants in the selection pipeline, what kinds of messages do you use? The evil Passive Voice type (“Your application has been received”) is a surefire talent barrier. Why not say “Wow! Thanks for applying for a job with us. Give us a few days to look at our openings and your background. We’ll back in touch, either way!” Then, actually close the loop. None of this mealy-mouthed “If we want to call you, we will” stuff meets the Human Workplace test. You can do better than that.

 

INFLEXIBLE TIME OFF POLICIESOnce a new hire comes on board, he or she can only dive into the job whole-heartedly if the rest of his or life is attended to. A client of ours took a job and quit on the first day, during orientation, when she asked the orientation leader “How would it work if I have a court case three weeks from today, a half hour away in the city? I only need to leave an hour early.”

The orientation chickadee said “There’s no provision for that. You have to come in. You don’t get time off benefits for sixty days.”

The new employee, sensing danger, said “No problem, I’ll talk to my manager about it” and the orientation gal said “I’ve already noted your name and the date. You must change your personal schedule that day.”

The newbie bailed, her hiring manager called her to say “But I would have figured it out for you!” and the ex-employee said “Culture is everything. I’m not taking a job with a manager whose response to Godzilla process is to sneak around it.” If you don’t find your voice in a case like that, when will you ever do it?

HEAR NO EVIL FEEDBACK SYSTEMS

My science friends tell me that entropy is a feature of closed systems. When no new information comes in, things break down. So it is in corporations where there’s no upward feedback, such that executive leaders are spared the inconvenience of reacting to messy reality and permitted to bask in the awesomeness of their delusional plans undisturbed. If your employer doesn’t have robust, active, constant feedback mechanisms in place and an appetite for hearing about life on the street, you’re pushing away talent as we speak.

SCROOGETASTIC COMPENSATION PLANS

I was a corporate HR leader for decades. If you want to gauge an organization’s ability to snag and keep talent, look at its pay policies. When you knock the ball out of the park and your manager says “I’m really sorry, but I can only give you a two percent raise, because, you know, it’s our policy,” you’ve learned all you need to know about the importance of talent in your shop.

HEY, YOU STOLE MY IDEAThey say information is power. If people use information like a club to beat one another with, nothing good will happen for your clients or shareholders. If your organization is the kind where people keep quiet about their ideas to prevent them from being stolen, the universe wants you to hightail it out of there. If you’re in charge of a joint like that, you’ve got some trust-building work to do.

GODZILLA PROCESSES

Some processes are good, but lots of them are cumbersome, slow and stupid. Check out our Nine Signs of a Bad Process wheel below to see what I’m talking about. If people who come to work ready to rock it are prevented from doing their work because some fear-based process is gumming up the works, I guarantee you’re losing talent. People might be sitting at their desks when you walk by, but their hearts and brains are elsewhere.

 

CONSTRUCTIVE SNIPINGLeaders who can coach and inspire employees are one in a million, and thank God for them! Leaders who pick and quibble and snipe are people who fear that a Mojofied team might threaten their own petty power. If your environment is a snipe-fest, good people won’t stay. How can you get anything important done in a place like that?

 

TRIUMPH OF THE BEST AND BROWN-NOSIEST The last Talent Repellent on our list is a culture that rewards brown-nosing and punishes honest dissent. Most of us have seen organizations like this, where Yes Men and Women are exalted and passionate people asking tough questions are silenced. Life is too short to work in a place like that. The world is too big, there are too many meaty problems to solve, and too many brilliant people for you to collaborate with in trust-based, forward-looking organizations for you to waste another femtosecond among Godzilla’s handlers.

In your job search and on the job, only the people who get you deserve you. Your gut knows the difference. Can you listen to it?

Categories
Lifestyle

Nigerian Scam – Woman Scammed Out Of US$500K On Christian Dating Site

A 66-year-old Californian meets a man claiming to be Irish. Before she knows it, she is embroiled in a Nigerian scam.

You can’t look them in the eyes. That’s the difference between meeting someone online and meeting them in real life.

One California woman might be wishing that she had looked her online date in the eyes, before she parted with $500,000. As CBS San Francisco reports, the 66-year-old woman met a man on ChristianMingle.com. She thought he was an Irishman working on a Scottish oil rig. He turned out to be a Nigerian man who had only one thing on his mind. Sadly, that one thing was money.

Deputy District Attorney Cherie Bourland said that the woman fell victim to “the love drug.”

The man, who claimed his name was David Holmes, asked her for $300,000 to help him start an oil business. It’s hard enough to give any money — let alone that amount — to someone you know. But to give it to someone whose eyes you’ve never looked at live shows a true love narcosis.

Fortunately, she wired him another $200,000.

It was this wire that allowed police to encounter Wisdom Onokpite. The woman sent the money to a Turkish bank and when Onokpite walked into the bank to withdraw the money, the authorities were alerted. It turned out that he was an accomplice of the man who had enchanted the woman — with a profile picture of a male model — on Christian Mingle. That man has still not been caught.

At least the woman got this $200,000 back.

It’s so easy to accuse those caught in this way of being naive or even stupid. It’s easy to laugh at someone who might think that a Christian dating site is somehow immune from those who prey on the vulnerable. But loneliness can drive every human being to a level of distraction that turns their actions into wild expressions of the most unlikely hope.

Why not now? Why not him? Why not me? It’s always worth, though, seeing what your hope looks like in real life first.

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Culled from CNET